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What Earth's Forest Fires Mean For Its Oxygen Levels

NPR News - Environment - Mon, 2019/09/02 - 2:45am

David Greene talks with science writer Peter Brannen about fires in the Amazon and across central Africa, and about what people get wrong when we talk about the Earth's forests burning.

Categories: Environment

National Trust membership tops 5.5 million

Guardian Environment News - Sun, 2019/09/01 - 4:01pm

The charity also spent a record £148m on conservation and restoration in 2018/19

National Trust membership has climbed above 5.5 million in a record-breaking year for conservation spending.

The charity announced in its annual report that its membership had increased in the past year by more than 300,000 to 5,600,000. It also revealed that it had spent more than £148m on conservation and restoration projects in 2018/19.

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Categories: Environment

UK funding to tackle climate crisis 'must double', government warned

Guardian Environment News - Sun, 2019/09/01 - 4:01pm

Charities write to Sajid Javid requesting increase of spending from £17bn to £42bn over next three years

Britain’s biggest environmental groups have warned the government that funding to tackle the climate emergency must be more than double next year to avoid an even greater cost from catastrophic ecological breakdown in the future.

Writing to the chancellor, Sajid Javid, as he prepares to announce on Wednesday his spending priorities for the year ahead, more than a dozen leading environment charities, including Greenpeace and Friends of the Earth as well as other leading organisations such as Oxfam and Christian Aid, said urgent action was required to raise spending.

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Categories: Environment

Grubs up: a third of Britons think we'll be eating insects by 2029

Guardian Environment News - Sun, 2019/09/01 - 4:01pm

Research finds belief that scoffing crickets or worm burgers will be commonplace

Nearly a third of Britons believe insects will eventually be part of mainstream human diets in the UK amid mounting challenges in food production, new research reveals.

With UK farmers facing pressure from the climate crisis, pests and plant diseases – alongside the need to boost productivity and compete with imports – research released on Monday claims that 32% of British adults think that regularly tucking into cricket snacks and buffalo worm burgers will become commonplace within 10 years.

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Categories: Environment

Meteorologist On Category 5 Dorian

NPR News - Environment - Sun, 2019/09/01 - 2:07pm

NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Jeff Huffman, a meteorologist from the Florida Public Radio Emergency Network, about Hurricane Dorian.

Categories: Environment

Victory!

The Field Lab - Sun, 2019/09/01 - 1:35pm
1 Corinthians 15:55 O death, where is thy sting? O grave, where is thy victory? 56 The sting of death is sin; and the strength of sin is the law. 57 But thanks be to God, which giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ. 58 Therefore, my beloved brethren, be ye stedfast, unmoveable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, forasmuch as ye know that your labour is not in vain in the Lord.
Categories: Sustainable SW Blogs

A chilling truth: our addiction to air conditioning must end | Letters

Guardian Environment News - Sun, 2019/09/01 - 9:57am
Readers respond to Stephen Buranyi’s long read on how air cooling systems burn electricity and fuel global heating

Kudos to Stephen Buranyi for drawing attention to the growth of air conditioning worldwide and the accompanying taste for cold in a time of global warming (Blowing cold and hot, The long read, 29 August). Having lived and worked in the American south, I can attest there are even more pernicious dimensions to this addiction to cold. Restaurants and bars are kept uncomfortably chilly, thus encouraging higher levels of consumption (heat dampens the desire to eat), fuelling not only profits but the obesity crisis.

Cold has become a mark of prestige: the fancier the establishment, be it office block or shopping mall, the colder it is likely to be. Anecdotally, moving between these absurd temperature extremes several times a day seems to increase the incidence of colds. When I requested that the AC in my workplace (a public university) be set to a warmer level, the response of the facilities staff was to provide a heater for my office. Here in New York, a hotel on my street keeps a roaring fire in the lobby – in August – while the ambient indoor temperature is freezing. All this amounts to what Richard Seymour has recently called “climate sadism” – a form of masochism outwardly and ostentatiously directed, consumptive and destructive madness. May we find ways not to get caught up in its drive.
Emanuela Bianchi
New York

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Categories: Environment

Fracking will see the UK miss net‑zero emissions targets | Letters

Guardian Environment News - Sun, 2019/09/01 - 9:56am
Investment in fracking denies proper support to cheaper renewables, says David Cragg-James; government policies are damaging the environment, says Michael Miller; and Charles Harris on the importance of voting to bring about change

Ian Duncan, the UK’s minister for climate change (Letters, 31 August), vaunts our achievements and “ambitions to become one of the cleanest and most innovative energy systems in the world”. He allows a generous 30 years before a “net-zero emissions economy is achieved”, when the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has made it clear that real change must be evident in fewer than a dozen years.

How can he hope to realise his longer-term targets while pursuing fracking as a transitional fuel? Investment in the hugely expensive development of fracking denies proper support to cheaper renewables, and delaying the switch ties the operator and investor into the production of a fossil fuel until a return is achieved. That exposes communities to the harms already documented, and contributes – by combustion, extraction and transportation – to the climate change the government hopes to mitigate.

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Categories: Environment

Fracking protesters 'priced out' of Cuadrilla legal challenge

Guardian Environment News - Sun, 2019/09/01 - 6:14am

Judge denies costs protection over injunction restricting protests at Lancashire site

An environmental group has been forced to withdraw its legal challenge to a wide-ranging injunction by the fracking firm Cuadrilla after being “priced out of court”.

Three fracking protesters are facing court action after the energy company obtained the injunction restricting protests at its shale gas exploration site in Lancashire.

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Categories: Environment

Fears For The Amazon's Future

NPR News - Environment - Sun, 2019/09/01 - 5:21am

Deforestation rates in Brazil's Amazon are soaring under a far-right president who wants to exploit the forest's resources, including the Amazon River. A huge dam has brought in much development.

Categories: Environment

Dorian Heads Toward U.S.

NPR News - Environment - Sun, 2019/09/01 - 5:21am

NPR's Leila Fadel speaks with meteorologist Ray Hawthorne of the University of Florida about the path of Hurricane Dorian.

Categories: Environment

Hurricane Dorian Heads For Bahamas

NPR News - Environment - Sat, 2019/08/31 - 2:17pm

NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Rick Lohr, general manager of the Abaco Beach Resort in The Bahamas, about how he is bracing for Hurricane Dorian.

Categories: Environment

chairs...

The Field Lab - Sat, 2019/08/31 - 12:36pm
The client sent out a couple of chairs for me and the guy who is helping me build the Casita...88,97,72,0,B
Categories: Sustainable SW Blogs

Can fashion keep its cool … and help save the planet?

Guardian Environment News - Sat, 2019/08/31 - 11:00am
The catwalk world of glamour and luxury hides a business that thrives on wasteful consumerism. Now the climate crisis is forcing a rethink

In the last days of August, an influx of slender women to midtown Manhattan signals the onset of fashion week, the biannual round of catwalk shows. After passing on to London, Milan and then Paris, the prevailing sensibility coheres into an agreed style.

Only this season, the last of the decade, that sensibility may be about to evaporate. A summer of fire in the high Arctic and the Amazon was capped by something to celebrate; the arrival in New York harbour of the 16-year-old Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg after she crossed the Atlantic on an emissions-free yacht.

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Categories: Environment

Where are the architects who will put the environment first?

Guardian Environment News - Sat, 2019/08/31 - 6:00am

Should we stop building airports? Return to mud and thatch? The climate crisis is an opportunity for creative thinking, but the values of architecture need a radical overhaul

Nearly 40% of UK greenhouse gas emissions, to use a figure architects love to bandy, are caused by the built environment. Or a bit more, depending on the definitions used. It’s an arresting figure. It suggests that the design of buildings and the planning of cities can do much to counter climate crisis.

Architects like to think of themselves as public-spirited, well-intentioned people. The profession tends to attract people who want to change the world for the better. And what could matter more than the prevention of environmental and societal collapse? It makes squabbles about architectural style or form seem trivial by comparison. So what would architecture look like – more importantly, what would it be – if all involved really and truly put climate at the centre of their concerns? Would there be no more concrete, given the material has been fingered as particularly destructive? Or an end to towers clad in panels that have to be replaced every 30 years? Or much less building altogether?

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Categories: Environment

Do the Brazil Amazon fires justify environmental interventionism? | Lawrence Douglas

Guardian Environment News - Sat, 2019/08/31 - 3:00am

All the reasons that support the project of humanitarian intervention apply with equal, if not greater force, in the case of the environment

The horrific destruction of the Amazon rainforest under Brazil’s far-right president, Jair Bolsonaro, raises a pressing question for the world community: do the prerogatives of sovereignty entitle a nation to destroy resources within its territorial control, when this destruction has global environmental consequences? The answer delivered by France’s president, Emmanuel Macron, at the G7 summit is an emphatic no. It is time for the international community to build on Macron’s lead and to recognize a right to environmental intervention patterned on the notion of humanitarian intervention.

For centuries, the international community treated sovereignty as an absolute shield against intervention in a state’s domestic affairs. International law insisted that a nation’s treatment of its own citizens and legal subjects was not a matter of international legal concern. The ideology of sovereignty authorized a nation to treat – and mistreat – its people as it saw fit.

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Categories: Environment

Boiling point: in Tucson, not everyone is equal in the face of heat

Guardian Environment News - Sat, 2019/08/31 - 2:00am

As summers get more intense, people who work outdoors, those on a low income and the elderly face imminent peril

To live in Tucson is to be exposed. The Arizona city unfolds beneath four mountain ranges and a gaping sky, welcoming relentless sunlight. Anything here can be sun-bleached – billboards, garden hoses, family photos near windows, laundry left out to dry. Most of the year it’s a dry heat, and sweat evaporates off skin faster than it’s produced.

Summertime is different. In monsoon season, heat and humidity steadily increase until a storm breaks. There is no other release. Heat cannot exit from the body, creating a claustrophobic feeling inside the skin. Sweat becomes a vital sign – its absence indicates heatstroke.

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Categories: Environment

Family of slain Honduran activist appeal to US court for help in her murder trial

Guardian Environment News - Sat, 2019/08/31 - 12:00am

The children of Berta Cáceres want to subpoena bank records to a luxury house purchased by the alleged mastermind of the murder

The children of murdered Honduran activist Berta Cáceres have applied to a US federal court to subpoena bank records linked to a $1.4m luxury house in Texas purchased by the alleged mastermind of the crime just months after the killing.

Cáceres, 44, a winner of the prestigious Goldman prize for environmental defenders, was shot dead at her home by a hired gunmen on 2 March 2016 after a long battle to stop construction of an internationally financed hydroelectric dam on the Gualcarque river, which the Lenca people consider sacred.

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Categories: Environment

World's fastest shark added to list of vulnerable species to regulate trade

Guardian Environment News - Fri, 2019/08/30 - 11:01pm

A record number of countries voted to restrict fishing of mako sharks in an effort to protect the endangered species

A record number of countries have voted to protect the world’s fastest shark from extinction in a move welcomed by conservationists as a “wake up call” for fishing nations who have ignored the endangered species’ decline.

In Geneva this week, governments voted under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) to regulate the international trade in both species of mako shark – long and short fin – in addition to 16 vulnerable species of sharks and rays.

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Categories: Environment

a friday night film

The Field Lab - Fri, 2019/08/30 - 3:59pm
Categories: Sustainable SW Blogs
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